[A papier-mâché mask of Indrajit (Indazita in Burmese, and Inthorochit in Thai), made in 19th-century Burma. Interesting because it hails from the Ramayana by way of Ayutthaya-era Siam’s khon performance of the Ramakian (รามเกียรติ์) which derived therefrom.]

[A papier-mâché mask of Indrajit (Indazita in Burmese, and Inthorochit in Thai), made in 19th-century Burma. Interesting because it hails from the Ramayana by way of Ayutthaya-era Siam’s khon performance of the Ramakian (รามเกียรติ์) which derived therefrom.]

(Source: omgthatdress)

[Image: A group of tais vendors at the Pasar Tais in Díli.]

[Image: A group of tais vendors at the Pasar Tais in Díli.]

(Source: eastimorlawjournal.org)

likhain:

[In warm golden light: calligraphy in brown ink, whose shading varies from dark chocolate to a more translucent sepia; thick italic strokes, letters close together, rendering the words “nasaan ang kabataang dapat na mag-alay ng kanyang kasariwaan”. The pad of paper on which the calligraphy is rendered (and the calligraphy dip pen with which it was written) sit atop the printed pages of an open book, a Tagalog translation of the El Filibusterismo.]
More practice, this time with a Brause italic nib that lahskdf is going to take me ages to get used to— but ah, enough complaining about nibs and more happy squeeing because while this is my first test, I really really like this effect! Must make more and figure out how the layout works!
One of my silly little dreams: to print (and sell?) shirts with calligraphy designs on them. Words as art as clothing, baby. Putting Rizal’s (and many other people’s) questions and hopes all too visibly on one’s chest.
(Words are from the El Fili by Jose Rizal, Virgilio Almario translation.)

likhain:

[In warm golden light: calligraphy in brown ink, whose shading varies from dark chocolate to a more translucent sepia; thick italic strokes, letters close together, rendering the words “nasaan ang kabataang dapat na mag-alay ng kanyang kasariwaan”. The pad of paper on which the calligraphy is rendered (and the calligraphy dip pen with which it was written) sit atop the printed pages of an open book, a Tagalog translation of the El Filibusterismo.]

More practice, this time with a Brause italic nib that lahskdf is going to take me ages to get used to— but ah, enough complaining about nibs and more happy squeeing because while this is my first test, I really really like this effect! Must make more and figure out how the layout works!

One of my silly little dreams: to print (and sell?) shirts with calligraphy designs on them. Words as art as clothing, baby. Putting Rizal’s (and many other people’s) questions and hopes all too visibly on one’s chest.

(Words are from the El Fili by Jose Rizal, Virgilio Almario translation.)

In commemoration of the 35th Anniversary of the Proclamation of Independence and the International Year of Biodiversity, and in conjunction with a biodiversity survey conduced by the Timor Lorosa’e National University, the Republic of Timor-Leste launched a series of stamps featuring the Timor river frog, the snake-necked turtle, the island pitviper, the Timor monitor, the bronzeback serpent, and the saltwater crocodile.

(Source: timor-leste.gov.tl)

whatismyanmar:

The Myanmar dance performance at closing ceremony of 26th SEA Games, 2011 in Jakarta, Indonesia. 27th SEA Games will be held in Myanmar in 2013.

Prosperity (later retitled Fortune), the Chinese character 福 folded out of red paper, by Singaporean mathematician and origami artist Cheng Herng Yi.

Prosperity (later retitled Fortune), the Chinese character 福 folded out of red paper, by Singaporean mathematician and origami artist Cheng Herng Yi.

Huge many-coloured kites in the shape of octopodes at the 2006 Thailand Kite Festival.

Huge many-coloured kites in the shape of octopodes at the 2006 Thailand Kite Festival.

Professor Patrick D. Flores of the University of the Philippines’ Department of Art Studies will be giving a talk at the National University of Singapore on 2 December 2011 at 6.30pm. Entitled “Filipiniana: Collecting Culture in the Philippines” and part of the Curating Nation Talk Series, the presentation will discuss the creation and compilation of a “cultural” aesthetic from the colonial period to post-independence.

Professor Patrick D. Flores of the University of the Philippines’ Department of Art Studies will be giving a talk at the National University of Singapore on 2 December 2011 at 6.30pm. Entitled “Filipiniana: Collecting Culture in the Philippines” and part of the Curating Nation Talk Series, the presentation will discuss the creation and compilation of a “cultural” aesthetic from the colonial period to post-independence.

He lived—if you could call it that—two streets off
Boat Quay north. Tranquil as leaves left in a tea cup.
Always alone but never lonely. The daily bustle
Of barge and coolie ferrying rubber, rice and spice,
All energy and profit, for towkays and Guthrie’s,
Slipped past without ripple or sound or promise.

Edwin Thumboo reads his poem "Uncle Never Knew" at the President’s Command Performance 2009 at the Esplanade Theatre, accompanied by the Arts Sphere Chinese Chamber Ensemble (新加坡鼎艺室内乐团)。